Womens health 3

 

WOMEN'S HEALTH

 

At Allied Physical Therapy we strive to provide comprehensive therapy services to women of all ages. Our professional and caring staff have specialized training to meet the unique needs of women across the lifespan. Our goals are to help relieve pain, increase energy, and improve function to help women feel their best. 

Women's Health Issues: Obstetrics-Gynecology/Oncology

Common Women's Health Diagnoses/Health Problems   
  • Urinary Incontinence
  • Fecal Incontinence
  • General Pelvic Pain Disorders
  • Pelvic floor muscle dysfunction
  • Interstitial Cystitis
  • Dyspareunia or painful sexual intercourse
  • Musculoskeletal Pain occurring during pregnancy and post-partum
  • Osteoporosis/Fall prevention
  • Low Back Pain
  • Sacroiliac Pain
  • Fatigue/Fibromyalgia
  • Post-Hysterectomy Rehabilitation
  • Post-Caesarean/Vaginal Delivery Rehabilitation
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    Physical Therapy Treatment for the Women's Health Patient        
  • Comprehensive evaluation
  • Modalities: Ultrasound, TENS, Estim, Iontophoresis, Ice/Heat
  • Manual Therapy: joint mobilizations, soft tissue mobilization, trigger point release, modified
  • Thiele's massage
  • Biofeedback: vaginal/rectal/external
  • Electrical Stimulation: vaginal/rectal/external
  • Vaginal Dilators
  • Pelvic Floor Muscle Exercises Home Exercise Programs
  • Core Strengthening Body Mechanic Training
  • Flexibility/Stretching Exercises
  • Postural Education
  • Relaxation 
  • Pre & Post-Partum Therapy

    Prenatal Care

    As the fetus develops, your body size, posture and center of gravity change. Also during pregnancy, the hormonal changes cause ligamentous laxity, especially where the spine and pelvis connect. Often these changes are accompanied by some discomfort or pain. However, don't dismiss these pains as merely part of the pregnancy. Our physical therapist can work with your physician to determine what is causing your pain. There are helpful physical therapy interventions that can reduce the pain some women experience during pregnancy. »

    Prenatal Exercise Guidelines

    Exercise During Pregnancy...... Is it safe?

    Regular exercise is a very important part of a healthy lifestyle. Regular exercise can increase strength, muscle tone, flexibility and improve energy levels before, during and after pregnancy. It can prepare your body for labor and delivery. Regular exercise can also help prevent gestational diabetes, minimize constipation/bloating, improve sleep, and decrease back pain. Before you begin any exercise program, discuss it with your health care provider.

    Prenatal Exercise Guidelines

     

    1. Warming up and cooling down are very important. Avoid working too hard: this can redistribute blood flow away from your uterus to the muscles you are exercising.

    2. Regular daily exercise is better than spurts of exercise followed by prolonged periods of no activity.

    3. Drink water often: before, during and after exercise to avoid dehydration.

    4. Avoid lying on your back for more than 5 min after the 20th week of pregnancy. This decreases the oxygen your baby gets from your blood.

    5. Don't participate in sports/exercises in which you might fall or be bumped. (Ex: ice skating, skiing, horseback riding)

    6. Don't get overheated. Avoid outdoor exercise in hot, humid weather. Also avoid hot tubs, whirlpools or saunas. Getting overheated during pregnancy can increase the baby's temperature too much, affecting the cells developing in the baby's nervous system and brain.

    7. Do not exercise if you have an illness with a temperature of 100◦F or higher.

     

    Stop exercising and call you doctor if you experience any of the following:

     

    1. Bleeding or fluid leaking from the vagina

    2. Abdominal/chest pain

    3. Uterine contractions

    4. Dizziness/faintness

    5. Difficulty Walking

    6. Irregular heart beat

    7. Excessive muscle weakness

    Postnatal Care
    Regular exercise is a very important part of a healthy lifestyle. Regular exercise can increase strength, muscle tone, flexibility and improve energy levels before, during and after pregnancy. It can prepare your body for labor and delivery. Regular exercise can also help prevent gestational diabetes, minimize constipation/bloating, improve sleep, and decrease back pain. Before you begin any exercise program, discuss it with your health care provider.
    Post-Cesarean Section                                                                        
    After you've had your baby, you will want to get your body back on track with postnatal exercises. Our physical therapist can evaluate you for postural problems and abdominal weakness. Part of the postnatal exercise program may include pelvic floor muscle exercises to address any urinary or fecal incontinence symptoms.

    Men's Health

    Male Pelvic Floor Rehabilitation

    Dysfunction within the pelvic floor can contribute to altered bowel, bladder or sexual function.  Common complaints a pelvic floor PT addresses:

  • Urinary/fecal incontinence
  • Urinary frequency/urgency
  • Pelvic pain including genital pain
  • Post surgical pain
  • Constipation
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    Is Therapy Right For Me?

    You may need therapy if you answer yes to any of the following  

    If you answer yes to any of the following questions, you may benefit from physical therapy. Consult with your doctor about getting a prescription for physical therapy for a thorough evaluation and treatment plan

    1. Do you have difficulty completely emptying when you urinate?

    2. Does your pain radiate to your lower abdomen, pelvic region or lower back?

    3. Do you have difficulty passing stool?

    4. Do you leak urine when you cough, sneeze or lift?

    5. Do you have tailbone or pelvic pain while sitting?

    6. Are you constipated regularly?

    7. Have your pelvic examinations become more painful?

    8. Do you have pain with urination?

    9. Do you leak fecal matter throughout the day?

    10. Do you have pain during or after intercourse?

    11. Do you strain to have a bowel movement?

    12. Do certain foods or drinks make your pain worse?

    13. Is your sciatic pain getting worse with the duration of your pregnancy?

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